Publications

22

Jul, 2015

Maraviroc Pharmacokinetics in HIV-1-Infected Pregnant Women

 

Authors: Colbers A, Best B, Schalkwijk S, et al. PANNA Network and the IMPAACT 1026 Study Team.

Published in: Clin Infect Dis. 2015; 61(10):1582-1589.

Objective To describe the pharmacokinetics of maraviroc in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected women during pregnancy and post partum.

Methods HIV-infected pregnant women receiving maraviroc as part of clinical care had intensive steady-state 12-hour pharmacokinetic profiles performed during the third trimester and ≥2 weeks after delivery. Cord blood samples and matching maternal blood samples were taken at delivery. The data were collected in 2 studies: P1026 (United States) and PANNA (Europe). Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated.

Results Eighteen women were included in the analysis. Most women (12; 67%) received 150 mg of maraviroc twice daily with a protease inhibitor, 2 (11%) received 300 mg twice daily without a protease inhibitor, and 4 (22%) had an alternative regimen. The geometric mean ratios for third-trimester versus postpartum maraviroc were 0.72 (90% confidence interval, .60–.88) for the area under the curve over a dosing interval (AUCtau) and 0.70 (0.58–0.85) for the maximum maraviroc concentration. Only 1 patient showed a trough concentration (Ctrough) below the suggested target of 50 ng/mL, both during pregnancy and post partum. The median ratio of maraviroc cord blood to maternal blood was 0.33 (range, 0.03–0.56). The viral load close to delivery was <50 copies/mL in 13 women (76%). All children were HIV negative at testing.

Conclusions Overall maraviroc exposure during pregnancy was decreased, with a reduction in AUCtau and maximum concentration of about 30%. Ctroughwas reduced by 15% but exceeded the minimum Ctrough target concentration. Therefore, the standard adult dose seems sufficient in pregnancy.

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18

Jul, 2015

I am scared of getting caught up in my lie’: challenges to self-reported adherence for young people living with HIV

 

Authors:  Bernays S, Seeley J, Paparini S, Rhodes T and the ARROW and BREATHER trial teams.

Published in: accepted for presentation at AIDS Impact, Amsterdam 28-31 July, 2015 (abstract 3435)

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18

Jul, 2015

Young people, clinical trials and ‘the HIV experience’: What can similarities across time and place tell us about growing up with HIV?

 

Authors:  Paparini S on behalf of Bernays S, Seeley S,  Rhodes T,  Namukwaya Kihika S,Kawuma-Kigawa R, Nakyambadde H, Kabajaasi O and the BREATHER Trial Team.

Published in: 3rd International ASSHH Conference, Stellenbosch, South Africa, 6-9 July 2015.

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18

Jul, 2015

“But it’s my story”: exploring the experience and effect of telling children how they have acquired HIV

 

Authors:  Seeley J on behalf of the Bernays S, Paparini S, Namukwaya Kihika S,  Rhodes T and the BREATHER Trial Team.

Published in: 3rd International ASSHH Conference, Stellenbosch, South Africa, 6-9 July 2015.

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14

Jul, 2015

Early antiretroviral therapy in children perinatally infected with HIV: a unique opportunity to implement immunotherapeutic approaches to prolong viral remission

 

Authors: Klein N, Palma P, Luzuriaga K, et al.

Published in: Lancet Infect Dis. 2015;15(9):1108-1114

Abstract From the use of antiretroviral therapy to prevent mother-to-child transmission to the possibility of HIV cure hinted at by the Mississippi baby experience, paediatric HIV infection has been pivotal to our understanding of HIV pathogenesis and management. Daily medication and indefinite antiretroviral therapy is recommended for children infected with HIV. Maintenance of life-long adherence is difficult and the incidence of triple-class virological failure after initiation of antiretroviral therapy increases with time. This challenge shows the urgent need to define novel strategies to provide long-term viral suppression that will allow safe interruption of antiretroviral therapy without viral rebound and any associated complications. HIV-infected babies treated within a few days of birth have a unique combination of a very small pool of integrated viruses, a very high proportion of relatively HIV resistant naive T cells, and an unparalleled capacity to regenerate an immune repertoire. These features make this group the optimum model population to investigate the potential efficacy of immune-based therapies. If successful, these investigations could change the way we manage HIV infection.

1

Jul, 2015

“But it’s my story”: exploring the experience and effect of telling children how they have acquired HIV

 

Authors: Seeley J on behalf of the Bernays S, Paparini S, Namukwaya Kihika S,  Rhodes T and the BREATHER Trial Team.

Published in: 3rd International ASSHH Conference, Stellenbosch, South Africa, 6-9 July 2015.

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1

Jul, 2015

Young people, clinical trials and ‘the HIV experience’: What can similarities across time and place tell us about growing up with HIV?

 

Author: Paparini S on behalf of Bernays S, Seeley S, Rhodes T, Namukwaya Kihika S,Kawuma-Kigawa R, Nakyambadde H, Kabajaasi O and the BREATHER Trial Team.

Published in: 3rd International ASSHH Conference, Stellenbosch, South Africa, 6-9 July 2015.

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1

Jul, 2015

‘I am scared of getting caught up in my lie’: challenges to self-reported adherence for young people living with HIV; accepted for presentation at AIDS Impact

 

Authors: Bernays S, Seeley J, Paparini S, Rhodes T and the ARROW and BREATHER trial teams

Published in: AIDS Impact, Amsterdam 28-31 July, 2015 (abstract 3435)

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