COVID-19 Publications

30

Jul, 2020

SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Febrile Neonates

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Abstract Most severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections in pediatric patients are mild or asymptomatic. However, infants have emerged at higher risk of hospitalization and severe outcomes in pediatric coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We report a case series of 4 full-term neonates hospitalized with fever and found to have SARS-CoV-2 infection with a spectrum of illness severities. Two neonates required admission to the intensive care unit for respiratory insufficiency and end organ involvement. Half of the patients were found to have a coinfection. One neonate received antiviral therapy with remdesivir and is, to our knowledge, the youngest patient to receive this drug for COVID-19. All neonates had favorable outcomes.

Read the full case report here.

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29

Jul, 2020

Harmonisation preserves research resources

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The COVID-19 pandemic is highlighting the importance of international collaboration, particularly in the field of health and science. Collaborative efforts between study leads, scientific societies and researchers has the potential to speed-up research. Through sharing resources and results we can harmonize clinical characterization studies and fill the knowledge-gap in medical research.

This is the focus of a correspondence by Malte Kohns at St George’s University London to The Lancet Infectious Disease Journal. We are proud to have contributed to this work through the Penta global network of clinicians and researchers.

Read the full correspondence here.

29

Jul, 2020

Harmonisation preserves research resources

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In their Comment, the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium (ISARIC) clinical characterisation group outline how harmonisation of clinical characterisation studies is achieved through their collaborative resource-sharing and data-sharing platform. We fully agree with both the importance of international harmonisation and the authors’ approach. Yet, in our opinion, they could have expressed more clearly how important harmonisation is to use resources in research responsibly and efficiently.

Read the full correspondence here.

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29

Jul, 2020

Harmonisation preserves research resources

 

Authors: Vasconcelos MK, Epalza C, Renk H, Tagarro A, Bielicki JA

Published in: Lancet Infect Dis. 2020;24

In their Comment, the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium (ISARIC) clinical characterisation group outline how harmonisation of clinical characterisation studies is achieved through their collaborative resource-sharing and data-sharing platform. We fully agree with both the importance of international harmonisation and the authors’ approach. Yet, in our opinion, they could have expressed more clearly how important harmonisation is to use resources in research responsibly and efficiently.

 

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23

Jul, 2020

COVID-19 research priorities identified by the Global Research Community Survey & Workshops

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The Global Health Network (TGHN), in collaboration with the African Academy of Science (AAS) and the United Kingdom Collaborative on Development Research (UKCDR) undertook a survey to identify the COVID-19 global research priorities, with particular consideration to lower resource settings.

Results of the survey are presented in this report, highlighting where research focus is needed across the globe to tackle COVID-19 and future outbreaks

Download the report.

23

Jul, 2020

The remaining unknowns: A mixed methods study of the current and global health research priorities for COVID-19

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Introduction In March 2020 the World Health Organisation (WHO) released a Global Research Roadmap in an effort to coordinate and accelerate the global research response to combat COVID-19 based on deliberations of 400 experts across the world. Three months on, the disease and our understanding have both evolved significantly. As we now tackle a pandemic in very different contexts and with increased knowledge, we sought to build on the work of the WHO to gain a more current and global perspective on these initial priorities.

Methods We undertook a mixed methods study seeking the views of the global research community to i) assess which of the early WHO roadmap priorities are still most pressing; ii) understand whether they are still valid in different settings, regions or countries; and iii) identify any new emerging priorities.

Results Thematic analysis of the significant body of combined data shows the WHO roadmap is globally relevant, however, new important priorities have emerged, in particular, pertinent to low and lower-middle income countries (less resourced countries), where health systems are under significant competing pressures. We also found a shift from prioritising vaccine and therapeutic development towards a focus on assessing the effectiveness, risks, benefits and trust in the variety of public health interventions and measures. Our findings also provide insight into temporal nature of these research priorities, highlighting the urgency of research that can only be undertaken within the period of virus transmission, as well as other important research questions but which can be answered outside the transmission period. Both types of studies are key to help combat this pandemic but also importantly to ensure we are better prepared for the future.

Conclusion We hope these findings will help guide decision making across the broad research system including the multi-lateral partners, research funders, public health practitioners, clinicians and civil society.

Read the full report here.

23

Jul, 2020

Plug COVID-19 research gaps in detection, prevention and care

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The Global Health Network (TGHN), in collaboration with the African Academy of Science (AAS) and the United Kingdom Collaborative on Development Research (UKCDR) undertook a survey to identify the COVID-19 global research priorities, with particular consideration to lower resource settings.

In this article Trudie Lang from TGHN, discusses survey findings.

Read the full article here.

 

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22

Jul, 2020

Update on COVID-19 pandemic

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Ilaria Capua  joined by Dr. Sonja Rasmussen provide a brief overview of the pandemic looking at the global situation/response and update us on the most recent clinical data.

Watch the webinar here.

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21

Jul, 2020

Co-infection and other clinical characteristics of COVID-19 in children

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Background and Objectives Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a newly identified pathogen that mainly spreads by droplets. Most published studies have been focused on adult patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but data concerning pediatric patients are limited. In this study, we aimed to determine epidemiological characteristics and clinical features of pediatric patients with COVID-19.

Methods We reviewed and analyzed data on pediatric patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19, including basic information, epidemiological history, clinical manifestations, laboratory and radiologic findings, treatment, outcome, and follow-up results.

Results A total of 74 pediatric patients with COVID-19 were included in this study. Of the 68 case patients whose epidemiological data were complete, 65 (65 of 68; 95.59%) were household contacts of adults. Cough (32.43%) and fever (27.03%) were the predominant symptoms of 44 (59.46%) symptomatic patients at onset of the illness. Abnormalities in leukocyte count were found in 23 (31.08%) children, and 10 (13.51%) children presented with abnormal lymphocyte count. Of the 34 (45.95%) patients who had nucleic acid testing results for common respiratory pathogens, 19 (51.35%) showed coinfection with other pathogens other than SARS-CoV-2. Ten (13.51%) children had real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis for fecal specimens, and 8 of them showed prolonged existence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA.

Conclusions Pediatric patients with COVID-19 presented with distinct epidemiological, clinical, and radiologic characteristics from adult patients. Nearly one-half of the infected children had coinfection with other common respiratory pathogens. It is not uncommon for pediatric patients to have prolonged fecal shedding of SARS-CoV-2 RNA during the convalescent phase.

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21

Jul, 2020

Lung ultrasound in children with COVID-19

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Abstract The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is rapidly spreading all around the world, affecting both adults and children. Recently, the clinical and radiographic characteristics of children infected have been described. Although lung ultrasound (LUS) is recognized as a valid imaging technique for the diagnosis and follow-up of pneumonia in pediatric age, no data are currently available about LUS use in children with COVID-19. Considering the well-known advantages of point-of-care ultrasound, including the possibility of reducing the patient’s movement across the hospital department, we investigated LUS findings in children infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome–coronavirus.

Read the full article here.

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