Publications

18

Mar, 2022

2-year outcome of early treated infants in Sub-Saharan Africa

 

Authors: A Tagarro, S Domínguez-Rodríguez, L Kuhn, T Nhampossa, K Otwombe, AJv Rensburg, N Klein, MG Lain, AI. Maiga, C Brehin, C Giaquinto, P Rossi, P Rojo

Presented at: CROI 2022

 

Abstract

The real-world evolution of very early treated children born with HIV in high-prevalence settings during first years of life is unclear. We assessed the probability of death, progression to AIDS, viral load (VL) suppression, immunosuppression, and continuation in care of a cohort of early treated children born with HIV.

EARTH-EPIICAL Cohort is underway at 2 rural and 4 urban sites in Mozambique, Mali, and South Africa (SA). Infants with HIV who started ART in the first 3 months of life, are followed at 2, 6 and 12 weeks, and then 6-monthly for 4 years. Hereby, we provide the probability of death, progression, suppression and continuation in care during the first 2 years of life with multivariable cox regression models were used. Backward stepwise elimination was applied to reach the final multivariable model.

212 participants were enrolled and followed during a median time of 17 [6.8;27.5] months; 84 reached 2 years of follow-up. ART started at 34 [26;74] days of life, mostly 3TC+ABC+LPV/r (65%). Adherence was suboptimal (<90%) in 56% of visits. 23 patients (10.8%) died, at a median of 2.5 [0.6;6.8] months of age. At 2 years, probability (P) of death was 12% (CI95%,7 to 17), (P) of progression was 11% (CI95%,6 to 16%), (P) of continuation in care, 80% (CI95%,74 to 86%), (P) of VL suppression was 46% (CI95%, 0.34-0.49), and (P) of severe IS, 54% (CI95%, 44 to 62). Death occurred predominantly in the first 6 months (74%); mostly due to pneumonia (43%), malnutrition (13%) or diarrhea (8.7%). (P) of death was associated with baseline VL 2.19 (1.4-3.3), and suboptimal adherence 2.88 (1.18-7.2). (P) of progression was associated with baseline VL 1.71 (CI95%,1.14-2.58), and weight for age 0.53 (CI95%,0.39-0.71). (P) of lost to follow up also was associated with baseline VL (HR, 1.60 (CI95%,1.06-2.40) and weight for age (HR, 1.67 (CI95%,1.11-2.50). (P) of suppression associated with baseline VL (HR, 0.60 (CI95%,0.51-0.71) and CD4% (HR, 1.04, (CI95%,1.01-1.06), p=0.01. (P) of severe IS was associated with baseline VL, (HR, 1.4 (CI95% 1.15-1.69), baseline CD4% (HR, 0.91 (0.88-0.93), baseline weight for age (HR, 0.86 (CI95%, 0.76-0.99), and Mozambique (HR 1.88 (CI95%, 1.16-3.1).

Despite early treatment and a close follow-up, death, progression, and severe IS remain high in children born with HIV in Africa, especially in the 6 first months. Additional strategies are required to improve the care of this population.

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18

Mar, 2022

Birth outcomes following prenatal exposure to dolutegravir: the DOLOMITE-EPPICC study

 

Authors: C Thorne, K Aebi-Popp, L Ene, M Floridia, AM Gamell, M Illan, H Peters, A Samarina, L Ragone, C Giaquinto, V Vannappagari

Presented at: CROI 2022

 

Abstract

Dolutegravir (DTG) is recommended and widely used during pregnancy for maternal viral suppression and preventing perinatal transmission of HIV. Our objective is to assess pregnancy and neonatal outcomes including birth defects following prenatal DTG use using real-world European data.

Dolomite-EPPICC is a multi-cohort European observational study of DTG use in pregnant women living with HIV and their infants. An analysis of prospectively collected data on all pregnancies with any prenatal DTG exposure and with birth outcomes was conducted among participating cohorts from Italy, Romania, the Russian Federation, Spain, Switzerland and UK/Ireland. Periconception exposure was defined as being within the first 6 weeks of gestation.

Overall, 550 pregnancies (540 singleton, 10 twin pregnancies) from 7 cohorts were included in the analysis resulting in 508 liveborn infants (491 singletons and 17 twins). Overall, 72.1% (365/506) pregnancies were in parous women. A total of 27 pregnancies ended in spontaneous abortion, 18 pregnancies were terminated and five ended in still birth. One termination was for neuronal migration disorder and severe microcephaly, with periconception DTG exposure. All stillbirths were exposed to periconception DTG, none with birth defects. Among the 508 liveborn infants, earliest DTG exposure was periconception for 326 (64.9%) infants, later in trimester 1 for 36 (7.2%) and in trimester 2/3 for 140 (27.9%); 6 had unknown timing of exposure. There were 21 infants with birth defects (4.1%, 95% CI 2.6, 6.2); one infant had 2 defects. The 22 defects were in the following systems: genitourinary (7), heart (4), limb (4 [polydactyly, 3]), gastrointestinal (2), chromosomal (1), other (4); no CNS defects were reported.

The prevalence rate for overall birth defects here is the same as recently reported from the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry for periconception exposure to DTG. Dolomite-EPPICC will continue to monitor use and safety of DTG-based regimens in pregnancy, noting that our sample size of periconception exposures is currently too small to exclude potential associations with rare birth defects like NTDs.

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11

Mar, 2022

Respiratory Syncytial Virus–Associated Hospital Admissions and Bed Days in Children <5 Years of Age in 7 European Countries

 

Authors: X Wang, Y Li, L.V Fernandez, A.C Teirlinck, T Lehtonen, M.V Wijhe, L Stona, M Bangert, R.M Reeves, H Bøås, M.V Boven, T Heikkinen, C.K Johannesen, E Baraldi, D Donà, S Tong, H Campbell, Respiratory Syncytial Virus Consortium in Europe (RESCEU) Investigators

Published in: The Journal of Infectious Diseases

8

Mar, 2022

ZIKAction paediatric registry: maternal characteristics and clinical, radiological, and follow-up features of children born with congenital zika infection in brazil

 

Authors: B.L de Almeida, I.C de Siqueira, M.L.C Lage, L.S Lopes, A.L de Carvalho, M.M de Lima, M.d.F.N Goes, M.N Crispim, B.G.G Costa, C Giaquinto, G Fernandes, E Ruiz-Burga, C Thorne on belhaf of Zikaction consortium

Presented at: WSPID 2022

Abstract

Background: In 2015, Brazil experienced an unexpected increase in newborns with microcephaly. Subsequently, the association between microcephaly and Congenital Zika Infection (CZI) was confirmed.

Aims: This study, part of the ZIKAction Paediatric Registry, intends to describe clinical, radiological, neurodevelopmental, and laboratory features and follow-up of children with CZI in Bahia, Brazil.

Methods: This observational study had following inclusion criteria: intrauterine exposure to ZIKV, laboratory-confirmed CZI, or meeting the definition of suspected CZI, based on clinical and radiological features. Results: Of 129 participants, 57% were female. Most mothers (75%) had symptoms suggestive of Zika infection during pregnancy. Median gestational age at delivery was 38 weeks, with 19% delivered preterm. Median birth length and weight were 46cm and 2690g, respectively. Most infants (118, 91.5%) had microcephaly (median head circumference Zscore -3.51, IQR -4.69,-2.73), and 17 (13.2%) have arthrogryposis. During follow-up, 96% and 92% of children had hearing and ophthalmological assessments, with 21% and 57% having abnormalities respectively. Brain image was abnormal in all cases, with ventriculomegaly (70.1%), cerebral parenchyma calcifications (62.1%), and cortical atrophy (48.6%) were main findings. Median age at last follow-up was 5 years; to date, 54 (42%) participants needed hospitalization, 44 (35%) needed care in the emergency department, and two (1.5%) died.

Conclusion: CZI is an emerging disease shown to have a varied spectrum. Registry children were biased towards those with more severe disease, with several abnormalities and complications observed. Continued long-term follow-up is essential to understand the prognosis and clinical spectrum as these children reach school-age.

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21

Feb, 2022

Borrowing information across patient subgroups in clinical trials, with application to a paediatric trial

 

Authors: R.M. Turner, A Turkova, C.L. Moore, A Bamford, M Archary, L.N. Barlow-Mosha, M.F. Cotton, T.R. Cressey, E Kaudha, A Lugemwa, H Lyall, H.A. Mujuru, V Mulenga, V Musiime, P Rojo, G Tudor-Williams, S.B. Welch, D.M. Gibb, D Ford, I.R. White & and the ODYSSEY Trial Team

Published in: BMC Medical Research Methodology

21

Feb, 2022

Dolutegravir dosing for children with HIV weighing less than 20 kg: pharmacokinetic and safety substudies nested in the open-label, multicentre, randomised, non-inferiority ODYSSEY trial

 

Authors: H Waalewijn, M.K Chan, P.D.J Bollen, H.A Mujuru, S Makumbi, A.R Kekitiinwa, E Kaudha, T Sarfati, G Musoro, A Nanduudu, A Lugemwa, P Amuge, C.L Moore, P Rojo, C Giaquinto, A Colbers, D.M Gibb, D Ford, A Turkova, D.M Burger

Published in: The Lancet

21

Feb, 2022

Antenatal Seroprevalence of Zika and Chikungunya Viruses, Kingston Metropolitan Area, Jamaica, 2017–2019

 

Authors: J.J. Anzinger, C.D. Mears, A.E. Ades, K Francis, Y Phillips, Y.E. Leys, M.J. Spyer, D Brown, A.M.B.d Filippis, E Nastouli, T Byrne, H Bailey, P Palmer, L Bryan, K Webster-Kerr, C Giaquinto, C Thorne, C.D.C. Christie, and on behalf of the ZIKAction Consortium

Published in: Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal

 

10

Feb, 2022

Treatment and monitoring of children and adolescents with hepatitis C in Russia: Results from a multi-centre survey on policy and practice

 

Authors: F Malik, V Chulanov, N Pimenov, A Fomicheva, R Lundin, N Levina, C Thorne, A Turkova, G Indofi

Published in: The Journal of viral elimination

30

Jan, 2022

Observed serial intervals of SARS-CoV-2 for the Omicron and Delta variants in Belgium based on contact tracing data, 19 November to 31 December 2021

Tags: ,

Authors: Kremer C, Braeye T, Proesmans K, André E, Torneri A, Hens N

Published in: MedRxiv

30

Dec, 2021

Dolutegravir as First- or Second-Line Treatment for HIV-1 Infection in Children

 

Authors: A Turkova, E White, HA. Mujuru, AR. Kekitiinwa, CM. Kityo, A Violari, A Lugemwa, TR. Cressey, P Musoke, E Variava, MF. Cotton, M Archary, et al for the ODYSSEY Trial Team

Published in: New England Journal of Medicine

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