Publications

18

Apr, 2014

Using CD4 Percentage and Age to Optimize Pediatric Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation

 

Authors: Yin D., Warshaw M., Miller W., Castro H., Fiscus S., Harper L., Harrison L., Klein N., Lewis J., Melvin A., Tudor-Williams G., McKinney R.

Published in: Pediatrics, 2014;134(4):e1104-16

Background Quantifying pediatric immunologic recovery by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation at different CD4 percentage (CD4%) and age thresholds may inform decisions about timing of treatment initiation.

Methods HIV-1-infected, HAART-naive children in Europe and the Americas were followed from 2002 through 2009 in PENPACT-1. Data from 162 vertically infected children, with at least World Health Organization “mild” immunosuppression and CD4% <10th percentile, were analyzed for improvement to a normal CD4% (≥10th percentile) within 4 years after HAART initiation. Data from 209 vertically infected children, regardless of immune status, were analyzed for CD4% outcomes at 4 years and viral failure within 4 years.

Results Seventy-two percent of baseline immunosuppressed children recovered to normal within 4 years. Compared with “severe” immunosuppression, more children with “mild” immunosuppression (difference 36%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 22% to 49%) or “advanced” immunosuppression (difference 20.8%, 95% CI: 5.8% to 35.9%) recovered a normal CD4%. For each 5-year increase in baseline age, the proportion of children achieving a normal CD4% declined by 19% (95% CI: 11% to 27%). Combining baseline CD4% and age effects resulted in >90% recovery when initiating HAART with “mild” immunosuppression at any age or “advanced” immunosuppression at age <3 years. Baseline CD4% effects became greater with increasing age (P = .02). At 4 years, most immunologic benefits were still significant but diminished. Viral failure was highest in infancy (56%) and adolescence (63%).

Conclusions Initiating HAART at higher CD4% and younger ages maximizes potential for immunologic recovery. Guidelines should weigh immunologic benefits against long-term risks.

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18

Apr, 2014

Post-licensing safety of fosamprenavir in HIV-infected children in Europe.

 

Authors: Judd A, Duong T, Galli L, et al; on behalf of the European Pregnancy and Paediatric HIV Cohort Collaboration study group in EuroCoord.

Published in: Pharmacoepidemiol  Drug Saf. 2014;23(3):321-5

Purpose Fosamprenavir, combined with low-dose ritonavir (FPV/r), is indicated for treatment of HIV-infected children aged ≥6 years in Europe. Our purpose was to assess the safety of licensed use of FPV/r in HIV-infected children reported to six cohorts in the European Pregnancy and Paediatric HIV Cohort Collaboration.

Methods Retrospective analysis of individual patient data for all children aged 6–18 years taking the licensed dose of FPV up to 31/12/10. Adverse events (clinical events and absolute neutrophil counts, total cholesterol and triglycerides, and alanine transaminase) were summarised and DAIDS gradings characterised severity.

Results Ninety-two HIV-infected children aged 6–18 years took the licensed dose, comprising 3% of the total number of children in follow-up in participating cohorts. Median age at antiretroviral therapy initiation was 6 years (interquartile range 1–11 years), and median age at start of FPV/r was 15 years (12–17 years). Estimated median time on an FPV-containing regimen was 52 months, with a total of 266.9 patient years of exposure overall. Half (54%) were on an FPV-containing regimen at last follow-up. Rates of grade 3/4 events were generally low for all biochemical toxicity markers, and no serious adverse events considered to be causally related to FPV/r were reported.

Conclusions Results suggest that long-term licensed dose FPV-containing regimens appear to be generally well tolerated with few reported toxicities in HIV-infected children in Europe, although relatively infrequently prescribed. No serious events were reported.

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10

Apr, 2014

Pharmacokinetics of Pediatric Lopinavir/Ritonavir Tablets in Children When Administered Twice Daily According to FDA weight bands.

 

Authors: Bastiaans DE, Forcat S, Lyall H, et al.

Published in: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014;33(3):301-305

Background Lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) pediatric tablets (100/25 mg) are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) as part of combination antiretroviral therapy. Dosing is based on body weight bands or body surface area under FDA approval and only body surface area by the EMA. This can lead to a different recommended dose. In addition, weight band–based dosing has not been formally studied in the target population. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics (PK) of LPV/r in children, administered twice daily according to the FDA weight bands, using pediatric tablets.

Methods Fifty-three HIV-infected children were included in the PK substudy of the Paediatric European Network for the Treatment of AIDS 18 trial (KONCERT). In this study, children were randomized to receive LPV/r twice or once daily, according to FDA weight bands. A PK assessment was performed in 17, 16 and 20 children in the 15–25 kg, ≥25–35 kg and >35 kg weight band, respectively, while children took the tablets twice daily. Rich sampling was performed, and PK parameters were calculated by noncompartmental analysis. Given the high percentage of Asian children, it was also tested whether there was a difference in PK parameters between Asian and non-Asian children.

Results For the total group, LPV geometric mean AUC0–12, Cmax and C12 were 106.9 h × mg/L, 12.0 mg/L and 4.9 mg/L, respectively. There were no significant differences in LPV PK parameters between the weight bands. In addition, weight was not found to be associated with variability in Cmax, C12 or AUC0–12 for the LPV PK parameters.

Conclusions FDA weight band–based dosing recommendations provide adequate exposure to LPV when using LPV/r pediatric tablets.

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